(Source: heyfunniest, via meanplastic)

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sesamestreet:

Doin’ the Pigeon. 

sesamestreet:

Doin’ the Pigeon. 

(via kim-jong-chill)

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(Source: dohnjorian, via shouldbestudyingmd)

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birdandmoon:

Venomous vs poisonous! If this one’s too small, you can read it on my site here. The animals are: northern copperhead, cane toad, tiger keelback snake, hooded pitohui, northern short-tailed shrew.
If you like my work, check out my Patreon, which is just $1.74 away from $200!

birdandmoon:

Venomous vs poisonous! If this one’s too small, you can read it on my site here. The animals are: northern copperhead, cane toad, tiger keelback snake, hooded pitohui, northern short-tailed shrew.

If you like my work, check out my Patreon, which is just $1.74 away from $200!

(via rhamphotheca)

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(Source: toomanyfandomsss, via ruinedchildhood)

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(Source: dailybroadcity, via pleatedjeans)

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scienceyoucanlove:

Going Deep





Gannets are the bird world’s Olympians, capable of plunging a hundred feet through the air, then slicing through the ocean to chase down fish. 

BY DAVID GESSNER
Published: July-August 2014
The wind blows a low glinting light over the white chop of the sea, spouts of water kicking straight up in the air. Hundreds of Northern Gannets, with six-foot wingspans, gather above the frothy ocean before tucking in their wings and dropping from the sky, hitting the water like white arrows. The birds cloud the air, dozens diving each second as if pulled from above toward some invisible vortex on the seafloor. It’s amazing they don’t collide with one another. Once they hit the water they don’t stop; they tunnel below it like a cormorant or loon, chasing down fish. These pursuits can last from five to seven seconds, occasionally more than 10, and take the birds down as far as 70 feet. The gannet’s plunge is almost three dives in one: the dive from the air, the slice into the water, and then the third dive, when they turn submariner.
Northern Gannets breed only in a few large colonies on rock cliffs, in fewer than 40 places in the world. They range across Quebec, Newfoundland, and the Gulf of St. Lawrence in North America, and from Brittany north to Norway in Europe. Their homes are remote, storm-tossed, and, at times, almost vertical, some nests held to the cliffs only by the bird’s own dung. You could build a poem just from the names of these great craggy rocks on both sides of the Atlantic: Bass Rock, Gullcliff, Bird Rock, Little Skellig, Sula Sgeir, Ailsa Craig. The largest of the single-island colonies, Bass Rock, holds more than 50,000 nests, and while there is something wild and singular about a gannet’s dive, the bird’s life, both in the air and on the ground, is a crowded one. We humans, upon seeing gannets plummet, usually reach for a metaphor and come up with words like “arrows,” “knives,” even “lawn darts.” But the similes are more consistent upon seeing their rocky homes: Almost everyone comes away from the experience saying that it looks as if the rocks were covered with snow. 
To breed among thousands of neighbors is tricky, and violence can break out at any moment, particularly between males, with sword-like bills stabbing. But what may at first look like a great blob of birds is actually ordered by an elaborate system of spacing and ritual, including courteous bows and not-so-courteous bites, and beautiful gestures like “sky-pointing,” when a gannet points its bill upward to indicate its imminent departure to its mate. It turns out that even gannets need their space, and if you measure the distance between nests, you will find exactly two for every 10 square feet.
read more

scienceyoucanlove:

Going Deep

Gannets are the bird world’s Olympians, capable of plunging a hundred feet through the air, then slicing through the ocean to chase down fish. 

BY DAVID GESSNER
Published: July-August 2014

The wind blows a low glinting light over the white chop of the sea, spouts of water kicking straight up in the air. Hundreds of Northern Gannets, with six-foot wingspans, gather above the frothy ocean before tucking in their wings and dropping from the sky, hitting the water like white arrows. The birds cloud the air, dozens diving each second as if pulled from above toward some invisible vortex on the seafloor. It’s amazing they don’t collide with one another. Once they hit the water they don’t stop; they tunnel below it like a cormorant or loon, chasing down fish. These pursuits can last from five to seven seconds, occasionally more than 10, and take the birds down as far as 70 feet. The gannet’s plunge is almost three dives in one: the dive from the air, the slice into the water, and then the third dive, when they turn submariner.

Northern Gannets breed only in a few large colonies on rock cliffs, in fewer than 40 places in the world. They range across Quebec, Newfoundland, and the Gulf of St. Lawrence in North America, and from Brittany north to Norway in Europe. Their homes are remote, storm-tossed, and, at times, almost vertical, some nests held to the cliffs only by the bird’s own dung. You could build a poem just from the names of these great craggy rocks on both sides of the Atlantic: Bass Rock, Gullcliff, Bird Rock, Little Skellig, Sula Sgeir, Ailsa Craig. The largest of the single-island colonies, Bass Rock, holds more than 50,000 nests, and while there is something wild and singular about a gannet’s dive, the bird’s life, both in the air and on the ground, is a crowded one. We humans, upon seeing gannets plummet, usually reach for a metaphor and come up with words like “arrows,” “knives,” even “lawn darts.” But the similes are more consistent upon seeing their rocky homes: Almost everyone comes away from the experience saying that it looks as if the rocks were covered with snow. 

To breed among thousands of neighbors is tricky, and violence can break out at any moment, particularly between males, with sword-like bills stabbing. But what may at first look like a great blob of birds is actually ordered by an elaborate system of spacing and ritual, including courteous bows and not-so-courteous bites, and beautiful gestures like “sky-pointing,” when a gannet points its bill upward to indicate its imminent departure to its mate. It turns out that even gannets need their space, and if you measure the distance between nests, you will find exactly two for every 10 square feet.

read more

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jasperislington:

I’m not angry.  I’m just disappointed that you’re not sharing your carrots.

jasperislington:

I’m not angry.  I’m just disappointed that you’re not sharing your carrots.

(via corgisbeggingforstuff)

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ridesabike:

Elaine Stritch rests her bike, reads a note, almost causes a riot.      
NEW YORK, June 26—TOLD TO KEEP HER SHIRT ON – Blonde Elaine Stritch, understudy to Ethel Merman in the Broadway hit, “Call Me Madam,” wears halter and shorts which cause her arrest in Central Park. Today she was fined $1 and told by Magistrate Emilio Jones, “A beautiful girl like you could cause a small riot and cause a large crowd to collect by removing your shirt.” “Well,” she replied, “I was there all day and nothing happened.” (AP, 1951)

ridesabike:

Elaine Stritch rests her bike, reads a note, almost causes a riot.      

NEW YORK, June 26—TOLD TO KEEP HER SHIRT ON – Blonde Elaine Stritch, understudy to Ethel Merman in the Broadway hit, “Call Me Madam,” wears halter and shorts which cause her arrest in Central Park. Today she was fined $1 and told by Magistrate Emilio Jones, “A beautiful girl like you could cause a small riot and cause a large crowd to collect by removing your shirt.” “Well,” she replied, “I was there all day and nothing happened.” (AP, 1951)

(via mrgolightly)

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(Source: albertstark, via zackisontumblr)

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hillaryrclinton:

darkarfs:

This is a gif from the 1993 Hulk Hogan movie Mr. Nanny. And I have one question…why is that guy in the background throwing his dog into the river? 

#HEY GUYS REMEMBER MY DOG??

hillaryrclinton:

darkarfs:

This is a gif from the 1993 Hulk Hogan movie Mr. Nanny. And I have one question…why is that guy in the background throwing his dog into the river? 

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comedycentral:

Click here to watch more of Jordan Klepper and Jessica Williams’s safety tips for college students from last night’s Daily Show.

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sctot:

i heard the funniest time travel joke tomorrow

(via kindymaling)

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emotionslikeateaspoon:

I feel like you should all watch this. Just persevere for a minute or so.

(Source: youtube.com, via kindymaling)

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scienceyoucanlove:

maptacular:

The Ebola outbreak that has killed hundreds of people in West Africa since it started in Guinea months ago has reached its second wave and is “totally out of control,” said an official for Doctors Without Borders.
As of Friday, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention put the number of cases at 362 — more than any other outbreak on record. Ebola is extremely deadly and this outbreak has killed 330 people, according to the World Health Organization.
via the Huffington Post

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scienceyoucanlove:

maptacular:

The Ebola outbreak that has killed hundreds of people in West Africa since it started in Guinea months ago has reached its second wave and is “totally out of control,” said an official for Doctors Without Borders.

As of Friday, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention put the number of cases at 362 — more than any other outbreak on record. Ebola is extremely deadly and this outbreak has killed 330 people, according to the World Health Organization.

via the Huffington Post

open in new tab or window to magnify large enough to read

634
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